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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
this country back on track. i think how he egypt plays it's cards is going to play a big role on the territory. with egypt at the back hamas will go all out. if they are telling hamas we are have the brother hood. and we have to find a way out of this with stabbility in tact that is going to be a different outcome. >> i think there is no question it was justified. the attacks, they had gone crazy in terms of the scope and intensity. the problem is that the people there, they have a tactical approach here. they are hitting back and have been trying to do this. israel has invaded gaza and these are tactical moves and they succeed. but what is the strategy to deal with gaza? how does this help and how does it play out with the regional strategy? so, i think there is no question it is just fied, the question is, is it smart? is. >> there is real concern and if you don't have cooperation, ultimately you can't control gaza. this undermines the authority and probably is going to undermine the un path which it might like because it shows that the palestinians are divided. we spoke to the prime ministe
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
netanyahu of israel and president mohammed morsi of egypt. the main word they're using is de-escalate telling the two nations to scale back the violence but so far neither side is willing to cease-fire unless the other will bend to their demands. egypt does have a peace tree with israel which is why that country could be the key in putting a stop to the violence. more john fuglesang coming up after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an viewer created ad message for little caesars who proudly salutes united states veterans everywhere. >> clarksville is a small town on the tennesse/kentucky boader and it is a really great place to raise a family. my name is lloyd allard i was a chief officer in the special forces, i was in the army for 23 years. i have made 1400 parachute jumps. well, my experience in the military was varied. i spent a lot of time in iraq, a lot of time in kuwait. i did two tours in iraq and i decided it was time to do something different with my life. i saw little caesars as a way to give something back to my family. the lit
've pulled your ambassador out of cairo. is that peace treaty stween israel and egypt on the verge of collapse? >> it's vital not just for israel, egypt, it's vital for the entire region, for the world. we understand this. we think the egyptians understand this full well. the egyptians have played a constructive role in the past mediating -- i think they can play the similar role today. >> are they? >> i think they can. >> but are that? >> that's all i can say right now is i think they can play a constructive role. and we hope they will. >> that suggests to me they're not yet doing that. >> well, right now the situation's very fluid on the ground. and hamas shows every intention of escalating further. it's not stepping down. >> mr. ambassador, thanks very much for coming in. we're watching this situation very, very closely. >> thank you, wolf. >> michael oren is the israeli ambassador to the united states. in our next hour we're going to take a look at what the u.s. -- if the u.s. can do anything about this escalating violence that's going on, the tensions escalating between the is
. this will be the first press conference since that attack in egypt that killed a u.s. ambassador and three other americans. and i wouldn't be surprised as well, carol, if he gets questions about looming cabinet appointments. >> i bet he will. news conferences used to be a regular occurrence with the president. any chance these will happen more frequently? >> reporter: i don't know. we did see in the campaign that the president preferred to, instead, do sbrinterviews with local stations and use social media. obviously when there's a press conference with the white house press corps and we're all very intensely familiar with his record, it's clear that the white house has felt that the downside of a misstep has far outweighed the benefit they would get from this. however, it would be very unusual if president obama did not have this press conference after an election. this is sort of the norm that a president does this. george w. bush had one two days after he was re-elected. clinton, three days after he was elected. reagan actually had one the morning after he was re-elected, carol. eight days he
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)